An analysis of the relationship between frankenstein and the creature in frankenstein by mary shelly

The creature and Frankenstein are doubles of each other in many ways.

An analysis of the relationship between frankenstein and the creature in frankenstein by mary shelly

Shelly exposes us to a lot of human insecurities through the characters in the novel. As Victor reaches the Arctic Circle, he catches pneumonia and is rescued by a nearby ship, which was exploring the area.

The Dream Victor's ego seems to command him but his dreams rip him into reality. The boy gets frightened and instead of responding to his gesture, the boy threatens to call his father. Had he contented himself with ordinary scientific pursuits like the rest of his colleagues, none of his family would have been murdered. His response to receiving mistreatment is to murder innocent people, and this is also unacceptable. While reading, the audience is able to question whether they should sympathize with Victor Frankenstein, who agonized over self-inflicted guilt, the loss of his family members and friends and acted cruelly to his creation, over the monster that despite all his good intentions was universally hated by everyone he came across and ended up wrongfully taking the life of innocent people By the end of the novel both Victor and the monster have become one. Love turns to hate in the monster as his desires are forbidden. Like anyone else, the Frankenstein monster craves companionship from another, if not from his creator, then from another being created with his same proportions.

Victor changed his mind one evening after he had begun collecting body parts for the new female monster and from that moment the relationship changed dramatically. They both have perpetrated many evils against each other, and they both have suffered so much that readers cannot help but offer their sympathies to both.

relationship between creator and creation

The storm does blow up in reality but it serves to remind the reader of the storm which is going on in Victor's mind. The human face of the monster is brought out through several instances.

Coming under pressure, the creator could have yielded to the demands of the monster and hence gifted him with a female companion.

Victor seems to deny the monster what he has denied himself, a family life and wife.

She could write about these human insecurities because she experienced them first hand as a baby and as a young child herself. She is setting the tone for the rest of the scene and is foreshadowing the events to come. Imagine some sort of humanoid being with the mind of a human child in an eight-foot body, green with a nail in its head if you want. Coming under pressure, the creator could have yielded to the demands of the monster and hence gifted him with a female companion. You might complain that this is contradictory - but do it anyway. These themes are used to explore and develop the complex relationship between Frankenstein and his monster. He begins by introducing himself to the head of the family, the blind father. The relationship shifts between the two, in favor of the creature. Victor Frankenstein is both a double of the similarly ambitious Robert Walton as well as the creature he creates. All these help in establishing the anger or rage felt by the monster. She, her husband and friend passed evenings telling each other ghoulish stories. Victor denies the monster any social acceptance of any kind.

Shelley offers depth and meaning to Frankenstein by presenting sometimes covertly so insinuations of failed father and son relationships littered throughout the story.

The boy gets frightened and instead of responding to his gesture, the boy threatens to call his father. If everyone in the world who was ever mistreated and misunderstood went on killing sprees, Homo sapiens would cease to exist.

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Essay on Relationship Between Frankenstein and the Creature