Pass laws

Colloquially, passes were often called the dompas, literally meaning the "dumb pass. The pass also documented permission requested and denied or granted to be in a certain region and the reason for seeking such permission.

Employers often entered an evaluation of the pass holder's behavior. A passbook without a valid entry then allowed officials to arrest and imprison the bearer of the pass.

pass laws interview

Employers often entered a behavioural evaluation, on the conduct of the pass holder. In the South African Republic brought in two pass laws which required Africans to carry a metal badge. Not only did the focus on how to control change over time, but also who to control.

Pass Book Contents The pass book was similar to a passport in that it contained details about the individual, including a photograph, fingerprint, address, the name of his employer, how long the person had been employed, and other identifying information.

How did the pass laws change in 1952

Pass laws evolved from regulations that the Dutch and British enacted during the 18th and 19th-century slave economy of the Cape Colony. The law stipulated where, when, and for how long a person could remain. Alistair Boddy-Evans is a teacher and African history scholar with more than 25 years of experience. Helen Suzman MP mentioned the act the most eminent reform of a government had ever introduced. By this time, versions of pass laws existed elsewhere. During the '70s and '80s, many Africans who violated pass laws lost their citizenship and were deported to impoverished rural "homelands. Pass Laws have been due to two specific white needs. As these demands and beliefs changed, so did the rights of the black population in South Africa. Only those employed by a master were permitted to remain on the Rand. Colloquially, passes were known as the dompas, which literally meant the "dumb pass. To do so, they had to have Section 10 rights, based on whether [7] the person had been born there and resided there always since birth; the person had laboured continuously for ten years in any agreed area for any employer, or lived continuously in any such area for fifteen years; The Black Natives Laws Amendment Act of amended the Native Urban Areas Consolidation Act, stipulating that all black people over the age of 16 were required to carry passes, and that no black person could stay in an urban area more than 72 hours unless allowed to by Section Protest against the suffocating laws drove the anti-apartheid struggle—including the Defiance Campaign in the early '50s and the huge women's protest in Pretoria in Under law, any governmental employee could remove these entries, essentially removing permission to stay in the area. This was done to promote the superiority of Whites and to establish the minority White regime.

As these demands and beliefs changed, so did the rights of the black population in South Africa. InAfricans burned their passes at the police station in Sharpeville and 69 protesters were killed. Alistair Boddy-Evans is a teacher and African history scholar with more than 25 years of experience.

As the years past by, pass laws would be used less and less to prosecute people. If a pass book didn't have a valid entry, officials could arrest its owner and put him in prison. Only those employed by a master were permitted to remain on the Rand.

As defined by law, an employer could only be a White person.

What were the consequences of violating the pass laws

Pass Book Contents The pass book was similar to a passport in that it contained details about the individual, including a photograph, fingerprint, address, the name of his employer, how long the person had been employed, and other identifying information. The s saw significant opposition to pass laws being applied to black women. A major boost for their utilisation was the rise of the mining sector from the s: pass laws provided a convenient means of controlling workers' mobility and enforcing contracts. Protest against the suffocating laws drove the anti-apartheid struggle—including the Defiance Campaign in the early '50s and the huge women's protest in Pretoria in This conflict climaxed at the Sharpeville Massacre , where the anti-pass protestors led by the rival breakaway Pan Africanist Congress of Azania PAC surrounded the Sharpeville police station, prompting the police to open fire, killing 69 people and injuring over In , the revolutionary syndicalist International Socialist League South Africa , in conjunction with the syndicalist Industrial Workers of Africa and the early African National Congress organised a major anti-pass campaign. In the South African Republic brought in two pass laws which required Africans to carry a metal badge. Employers often entered a behavioural evaluation, on the conduct of the pass holder. If a pass book didn't have a valid entry, officials could arrest its owner and put him in prison. Legislative laws were passed to accomplish this, including the Land Act of , the Mixed Marriages Act of , and the Immorality Amendment Act of —all of which were created to separate the races. In , the government passed an even more stringent law that required all African men age of 16 and over to carry a "reference book" replacing the previous passbook which held their personal and employment information. Pass laws evolved from regulations that the Dutch and British enacted during the 18th and 19th-century slave economy of the Cape Colony. As the years past by, pass laws would be used less and less to prosecute people. Violating Pass Laws Africans often violated the pass laws in order to find work and support their families and thus lived under constant threat of fines, harassment, and arrests. It was replaced in by the Natives Urban Areas Consolidation Act, which imposed "influx control" on black men and also set up guidelines for removing people deemed to be living idle lives from urban areas.
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Apartheid Era Pass Laws of South Africa